As we drew nearer to the docks of Copenhagen I got the same feeling I always got when I neared Scandinavia, almost a coming home. From the first time I stepped ashore in Norway, nearly fifty years ago, I have felt at home there. I don’t know whether that is a stirring of my genetic memory (my family name is reputedly of Viking origin) or just my fancy, but it is always there.

We docked about 9 a.m. on Sunday morning. It was a warm sunny day again and JW and I were looking forward to going ashore. There were  minimal  regulations (we just had to show our cabin swipe cards to the two pleasant immigration police) and we were free to go on our way.

The tourist bus stopped (very conveniently) at the dockside and the driver was quite happy to accept Euros, so we commenced our journey.

The first stop was at the statue of The Little Mermaid, where we took the almost obligatory photographs, though there were so many tourists already there that I have to “borrow ” one of  JW‘s  pictures as I seem to have bits of people on mine !

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid

The next stop was the English Church. We did not go in, as it was Sunday morning and there was a service due.

English Church

English Church

 Next we looked for the Resistance Museum and seeing , as we thought, a group of tourists walking purposefully over a bridge, we followed them and found ourselves in an army barracks! By the time we realised that this was not a group of tourists, but 25,000 Danes in a “walkathon” around Copenhagen, it was too late to turn back.

A pair of friendly soldiers gave us directions to the museum and allowed us back over the “one way” bridge, which saved us a long walk, so we made our way back through the assorted walkers. They all seemed very cheerful. There were groups of teenagers, older couples and families with babies in prams and toddlers trotting alongside!

We found the museum easily. It is not a large museum, but very clearly laid out and well cared for. As we followed the history of the occupation through the pictures and artifacts, we realised that though we had had bombing etc. we had been very fortunate not to have known the horrors of occupation. The heroes of the resistance were so young and so brave.

We continued on our tourist bus, which had an interesting commentary, and realised that we would need a longer time there to see everything. This was to be true of most of the other cities we visited and we agreed that this cruise gave us a taster of what was available.

After lunch we went back to the small boutiques on the quayside. They were mostly designer outlets and, since I am not much interested in designer label clothes, my favourite shop was the Georg Jenson outlet, where I could have spent a fortune (if I had had one 🙂 ) The silverware has such simple stylish lines. We contented ourselves by buying Jennie  and GG a pair of candlesticks for their wedding anniversary and a few Christmas decorations.

After our little shopping spree we just sat and watched the people going by. There were many on bicycles. Somehow the ladies managed to look quite elegant, even the mothers who had a sort of children carrier on the front. There are many cycle lanes and cycle parking bays, and I think they must be fundamentally very honest and trusting as they just seem to leave their bicycles in a heap, as this picture outside the church shows!

Bicycles left outside church

Bicycles left outside church

 Sadly the day was over all too soon and we had to go back on board and leave those lovely friendly Danes, as we started on our next journey which was to Helsinki.

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